SUPC Educational Advancement Award

The Stanford Undergraduate Psychology Conference has a long history of supporting psychological science at the high school level. Since its inception in 2001, for example, the conference has donated up to $1,000 annually to an underserved high school or high school-related program in the United States. These monies come in the form of the SUPC Educational Advancement Award, and they have been used to purchase new academic materials, such as textbooks and audio visual equipment, and to support psychology-related educational programming initiatives.

Teachers from any high school, from anywhere in the United States, are encouraged to apply for the SUPC Educational Advancement Award if they have a compelling reason for requesting the support. Applications are very short and are judged with respect to the creativity of the proposed initiative, the potential for the initiative to impact students' educational advancement, and the specific needs of the school/program.

Award Application

The application date for the 2014 award will be Wednesday, April 30, 2014. Applications must be submitted online using the SUPC Educational Advancement Award Submission Form.

Recipients

2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
None
Oakland High School, Oakland, CA
Santa Clara High School, Santa Clara, CA
University High School, Los Angeles, CA
Yosemite High School, Oakhurst, CA
Oklahoma High School Research Day, Oklahoma City, OK
None
South San Francisco High School, San Francisco, CA
California Psychology Internship Council, San Francisco, CA
Gateway High School, San Francisco, CA
East Palo Alto High School, East Palo Alto, CA
WPA High School Student Scholarships, Irvine, CA
South San Francisco High School, San Francisco, CA

 



Did you Know...
● SUPC has always been deeply devoted to promoting psychology at the high school level


● The first annual SUPC donated its proceeds to South San Francisco High School, which used the money to purchase new student textbooks


● The textbooks they were using were printed in 1984 and described students "spinning records on a 33 1/3 phonograph"



Since then, the Award has supported a number of different original and impactful educational initiatives